X good things in life: Processing fluency effects in the „Three good things in life“ exercise

The present study examined whether difficulty of recollection may influence the effectiveness of the “Three good things in life” exercise that has previously been shown to increase happiness. Participants were randomly assigned to write 1–10 good things that happened to them during the day in the course of two weeks. We measured life satisfaction, positive and negative affect before the exercise and three times after the exercise. We found no effect of the number of good things participants wrote each day. Life satisfaction and positive affect of participants did not increase after the two weeks of the exercise, but we found a reduction in negative affect. We further investigated various aspects of the exercise in exploratory analyses.

Citation: Bahník, Š., Vranka, M., Dlouhá, J. (2015). X good things in life: Processing fluency effects in the „Three good things in life“ exercise. Journal of Research in Personality, 55, 91-97. doi: 10.1016/j.jrp.2015.02.005

Where is my money? New findings in fiscal psychology

The essay outlines selected psychological attitudes towards taxes. We argue that the application of behavioural economics methodology to taxation is more than justified because, in their decision-making, taxpayers seem to be influenced by the perception of taxes rather than solely by their existence. We also discuss several real life examples of how tax salience affects the perception of taxes in various settings. The conclusion points out that the tax non-salience contributes to fiscal illusion, which allows governments to grow.

Citation: Houdek, P., Koblovský, P. (2015). Where is my money? New findings in fiscal psychology. Society, 52(2), 155-158. doi: 10.1007/s12115-015-9873-7

Many faces of bankers’ identity: How (not) to study dishonesty

Citation: Vranka, M.A., & Houdek, P. (2015). Many faces of bankers’ identity: How (not) to study dishonesty. Frontiers in Psychology, 6(302). doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00302

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4364084/